7 MODERN SINS AND THE 7 HEAVENLY VIRTUES

The modern Roman Catholic Catechism lists the sins "pride, avarice, envy, wrath, lust, gluttony, and sloth/acedia". Each of the seven deadly sins now also has an opposite among corresponding seven holy virtues (sometimes also referred to as the contrary virtues). In parallel order to the sins they oppose, the seven holy virtues are humility, charity, kindness, patience, chastity, temperance, and diligence.

7 MODERN SINS

1. Lust
Lust or lechery (carnal "luxuria") is an intense desire. It is usually thought of as excessive sexual wants, however the word was originally a general term for desire. Therefore lust could involve the intense desire of money, fame, or power as well.
In Dante's Purgatorio, the penitent walks within flames to purge himself of lustful/sexual thoughts and feelings. In Dante's Inferno, unforgiven souls of the sin of lust are blown about in restless hurricane-like winds symbolic of their own lack of self control to their lustful passions in earthly life.

2. Gluttony
Derived from the Latin gluttire, meaning to gulp down or swallow, gluttony (Latin, gula) is the over-indulgence and over-consumption of anything to the point of waste.
In Christian religions, it is considered a sin because of the excessive desire for food, and its withholding from the needy.
Because of these scripts, gluttony can be interpreted as selfishness; essentially placing concern with one's own interests above the well-being or interests of others.
Medieval church leaders (e.g., Thomas Aquinas) took a more expansive view of gluttony, arguing that it could also include an obsessive anticipation of meals, and the constant eating of delicacies and excessively costly foods. Aquinas went so far as to prepare a list of six ways to commit gluttony, including:
Praepropere - eating too soon.
Laute - eating too expensively.
Nimis - eating too much.
Ardenter - eating too eagerly (burningly).
Studiose - eating too daintily (keenly).
Forente - eating wildly (boringly).

3. Greed
Greed (Latin, avaritia), also known as avarice or covetousness, is, like lust and gluttony, a sin of excess. However, greed (as seen by the church) is applied to a very excessive or rapacious desire and pursuit of material possessions. St. Thomas Aquinas wrote that greed was "a sin against God, just as all mortal sins, in as much as man condemns things eternal for the sake of temporal things." In Dante's Purgatory, the penitents were bound and laid face down on the ground for having concentrated too much on earthly thoughts. "Avarice" is more of a blanket term that can describe many other examples of greedy behavior. These include disloyalty, deliberate betrayal, or treason, especially for personal gain, for example through bribery. Scavenging and hoarding of materials or objects, theft and robbery, especially by means of violence, trickery, or manipulation of authority are all actions that may be inspired by greed. Such misdeeds can include simony, where one attempts to purchase or sell sacraments, including Holy Orders and, therefore, positions of authority in the Church hierarchy.
As defined outside of Christian writings, greed is an inordinate desire to acquire or possess more than one needs, especially with respect to material wealth.

4. Sloth
Sloth (Latin, Socordia) can entail different vices. While sloth is sometimes defined as physical laziness, spiritual laziness is emphasized. Failing to develop spiritually is key to becoming guilty of sloth. In Christian faith, sloth rejects grace and God.
Sloth has also been defined as a failure to do things that one should do. By this definition, evil exists when good men fail to act.
Over time, the "acedia" in Pope Gregory's order has come to be closer in meaning to sloth. The focus came to be on the consequences of acedia rather than the cause, and so, by the 17th century, the exact deadly sin referred to was believed to be the failure to utilize one's talents and gifts.
Even in Dante's time there were signs of this change; in his Purgatorio he had portrayed the penance for acedia as running continuously at top speed.

5. Wrath
Wrath (Latin, ira), also known as "rage", may be described as inordinate and uncontrolled feelings of hatred and anger. Wrath, in its purest form, presents with self-destructiveness, violence, and hate that may provoke feuds that can go on for centuries. Wrath may persist long after the person who did another a grievous wrong is dead. Feelings of anger can manifest in different ways, including impatience, revenge, and vigilantism.
Wrath is the only sin not necessarily associated with selfishness or self-interest, although one can of course be wrathful for selfish reasons, such as jealousy, (closely related to the sin of envy). 
Dante described vengeance as "love of justice perverted to revenge and spite". In its original form, the sin of anger also encompassed anger pointed internally rather than externally. Thus suicide was deemed as the ultimate, albeit tragic, expression of hatred directed inwardly, a final rejection of God's gifts.

6. Envy
Like greed and lust, Envy (Latin, invidia) is characterized by an insatiable desire. Envy is similar to jealousy in that they both feel discontent towards someones traits, status, abilities, or rewards. The difference is the envious also desire that entity and covet it.
Envy can be directly related to the Ten Commandments, specifically "Neither shall you desire... anything that belongs to your neighbour". Dante defined this as "a desire to deprive other men of theirs." In Dante's Purgatory, the punishment for the envious is to have their eyes sewn shut with wire because they have gained sinful pleasure from seeing others brought low. Aquinas described envy as "sorrow for another's good".

7. Pride
In almost every list, pride (Latin, superbia), or hubris (Greek), is considered the original and most serious of the seven deadly sins, and the source of the others. It is identified as a desire to be more important or attractive than others, failing to acknowledge the good work of others, and excessive love of self (especially holding self out of proper position toward God). Dante's definition was "love of self perverted to hatred and contempt for one's neighbour." In Jacob Bidermann's medieval miracle play, Cenodoxus, pride is the deadliest of all the sins and leads directly to the damnation of the titulary famed Parisian doctor. In perhaps the best-known example, the story of Lucifer, pride (his desire to compete with God) was what caused his fall from Heaven, and his resultant transformation into Satan. In Dante's Divine Comedy, the penitents were forced to walk with stone slabs bearing down on their backs to induce feelings of humility.


7 HEAVENLY VIRTUES

1. Chastity
Abstaining from sexual conduct according to one's state in life; the practice of courtly love and romantic friendship. Cleanliness through cultivated good health and hygiene, and maintained by refraining from intoxicants. To be honest with oneself, one's family, one's friends, and to all of humanity. Embracing of moral wholesomeness and achieving purity of thought-through education and betterment. The ability to refrain from being distracted and influenced by hostility, temptation or corruption.

2. Temperance
Restraint, temperance, justice. Constant mindfulness of others and one's surroundings; practicing self-control, abstention, moderation, zero-sum and deferred gratification. Prudence to judge between actions with regard to appropriate actions at a given time. Proper moderation between self-interest, versus public-interest, and against the rights and needs of others.

3. Charity
Generosity, charity, self-sacrifice; the term should not be confused with the more restricted modern use of the word charity to mean benevolent giving. In Christian theology, charity—or love (agäpé) -- is the greatest of the three theological virtues.
Love, in the sense of an unlimited loving kindness towards all others, is held to be the ultimate perfection of the human spirit, because it is said to both glorify and reflect the nature of God. Such love is self-sacrificial. Confusion can arise from the multiple meanings of the English word "love". The love that is "caritas" is distinguished by its origin – being divinely infused into the soul – and by its residing in the will rather than emotions, regardless of what emotions it stirs up. This love is necessary for salvation, and with it no one can be lost.

4. Diligence
A zealous and careful nature in one's actions and work; decisive work ethic, steadfastness in belief, fortitude, and the capability of not giving up. Budgeting one's time; monitoring one's own activities to guard against laziness. Upholding one's convictions at all times, especially when no one else is watching (integrity).

5. Patience
Forbearance and endurance through moderation. Resolving conflicts and injustice peacefully, as opposed to resorting to violence. Accepting the grace to forgive; to show mercy to sinners. Creating a sense of peaceful stability and community rather than suffering, hostility, and antagonism.

6. Kindness
Charity, compassion and friendship for its own sake. Empathy and trust without prejudice or resentment. Unselfish love and voluntary kindness without bias or spite. Having positive outlooks and cheerful demeanor; to inspire kindness in others.

7. Humility
Modest behavior, selflessness, and the giving of respect. Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it is thinking of yourself less. It is a spirit of self-examination; a hermeneutic of suspicion toward yourself and charity toward people you disagree with. The courage of the heart necessary to undertake tasks which are difficult, tedious or unglamorous, and to graciously accept the sacrifices involved. Reverence for those who have wisdom and those who selflessly teach in love. Giving credit where credit is due; not unfairly glorifying one's own self. Being faithful to promises, no matter how big or small they may be. Refraining from despair and the ability to confront fear and uncertainty, or intimidation.

Source: Wikipedia


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12 comments:

Anonymous,  May 2, 2012 at 11:12 AM  

Very interesting

Anonymous,  August 29, 2012 at 3:51 PM  

You are either highly misinformed or you are intentionally misleading people. The parishioners do have access to the Catholic Bible. Even though it is not in the pews many bring their bible with them. In fact, it was the Catholics that compiled the books of the bible into the bible. It was Martin Luther that took books out of the Catholic Bible to make the Protestant bible. Also, the missiles that are provided in the pews have all of the readings from the bible in them. If you attend mass faithfully for 3 years you will have read the entire bible. Name one Protestant church that is so organized that once every 3 years it's congregation will have read the entire bible. I bet you can't.

Anonymous,  October 12, 2014 at 9:30 AM  

I do all 7 sins but still show a few heavenly virtues.sometimes i feel two poeple

AisLynn McLaren January 2, 2015 at 12:43 AM  

It was the Roman emperor Constantine who commissioned the Bible. Google the council of Nicea.

AisLynn McLaren January 2, 2015 at 12:50 AM  

Followers of Martin Luther are Lutherans not Protestant. He also did not remove books from the Bible, Lutherans use the same Bible as the Catholic church. He did, however, post the 95 Theses on the doors of the Sistine chapel. It's a list of 95 things the Catholic church does that goes against the teachings in the Bible, beginning with the worship of and prayer to the saints.

Anonymous,  August 1, 2015 at 8:50 PM  

You should never generalize other religions or generalize right. All the religions have many more things in common than differences. Its very stupid to even have a different name because they are all similar. There is no need to convert when you realize this but we can all just be proud of what we agree on. Isn't what we all agree on just or more valuable then what we disagree on? Why are we looking for error like it is a reward or even worth seeking... Think about that when you are distinguishing. We are all Buddhist catholic muslim Christian jewish hindu because when we are observing there similarities we are all of them at the same time... May someone read this and realize I'm correct because they agree... These are not my thoughts but all of ours because real recognizes real... Lets transform our understanding and help eachother

Daniel Law January 30, 2016 at 5:32 AM  

Matin Luther did not post his 95 Theses on the doors of the Cistine Chapel, he posted them on the doors of All Saint's Church in Wittenburg, Emperor Constantine commissioned 50 copies of a Bible, including the book of Judith, but the Council of Nicea did not in general create the Bible in it's general form. That took centuries of debate on what should and should not be included. The main source of the idea that the Bible was created at the Council of Nicea seems to be Voltaire.

Daniel Law January 30, 2016 at 5:33 AM  

Matin Luther did not post his 95 Theses on the doors of the Cistine Chapel, he posted them on the doors of All Saint's Church in Wittenburg, Emperor Constantine commissioned 50 copies of a Bible, including the book of Judith, but the Council of Nicea did not in general create the Bible in it's general form. That took centuries of debate on what should and should not be included. The main source of the idea that the Bible was created at the Council of Nicea seems to be Voltaire.

Daniel Law January 30, 2016 at 5:33 AM  

Matin Luther did not post his 95 Theses on the doors of the Cistine Chapel, he posted them on the doors of All Saint's Church in Wittenburg, Emperor Constantine commissioned 50 copies of a Bible, including the book of Judith, but the Council of Nicea did not in general create the Bible in it's general form. That took centuries of debate on what should and should not be included. The main source of the idea that the Bible was created at the Council of Nicea seems to be Voltaire.

Daniel Law January 30, 2016 at 5:34 AM  

Matin Luther did not post his 95 Theses on the doors of the Cistine Chapel, he posted them on the doors of All Saint's Church in Wittenburg, Emperor Constantine commissioned 50 copies of a Bible, including the book of Judith, but the Council of Nicea did not in general create the Bible in it's general form. That took centuries of debate on what should and should not be included. The main source of the idea that the Bible was created at the Council of Nicea seems to be Voltaire.

Daniel Law January 30, 2016 at 5:35 AM  

Matin Luther did not post his 95 Theses on the doors of the Cistine Chapel, he posted them on the doors of All Saint's Church in Wittenburg, Emperor Constantine commissioned 50 copies of a Bible, including the book of Judith, but the Council of Nicea did not in general create the Bible in it's general form. That took centuries of debate on what should and should not be included. The main source of the idea that the Bible was created at the Council of Nicea seems to be Voltaire.

Dnascot,  July 31, 2016 at 2:01 AM  

The Hillary campaign represents the 7 deadly sins, while the Trumps Campaign represents the seven heavenly virtues. I feel like a new 7 set of something should exist.

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